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Highland Council approve a community asset transfer on the Stac Pollaidh car park

In May 2021 Highland Council approved a community asset transfer on the Stac Pollaidh car park, Wester Ross, to The Outdoor Access Trust for Scotland. OATS will lease the car park for the next 25 years enabling the charity to improve visitor access to the iconic mountain. OATS has plans for parking for at least 65 vehicles and the development of public toilets, similar to what they have completed at The Fairy Pools on the Isle of Skye. Signage, interpretation boards, a viewing point, and maintenance of the hill path are also part of the plan.

The press and Journal covered the story here: https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/fp/news/highlands/3136870/asset-transfers-will-help-two-more-north-communities-tackle-tourism-pressures/

The West Highland Free Press covered the story here:

Ahead of Highland Council’s planning meeting Dougie Baird, CEO of OATS, said: “The rapid growth in visitors to Stac Pollaidh has overwhelmed the existing parking provision on an almost daily basis throughout the high tourist season. This has led to visitors parking both on the verges nearby and in any available passing places causing blockages to the road and damage to the side of the road. Due to a lack of public toilet facilities at the site, there has been a rise in the number of people using the surrounding land as a toilet. The Stac Pollaidh path itself has become degraded and eroded through the increasing foot traffic on what is a sensitive landscape. These factors have resulted in a very poor visitor experience.

“OATS has been working with the local community, the landowner and the Highland Council to find a solution, and we have agreed to seek long term tenancy of the land required to build a larger car park, a toilet and improved access around the site. Once complete the facility will provide local employment to look after the facility, and a sustainable source of income through car park charges to provide for the scheme, the hill path and other access projects.”

West Highland Free Press